An occupational Health and Safety for Agriculture Sector

An occupational Health and Safety for Agriculture Sector

Author/s

Rupinderjit Yadav, & Amrita Mohan

Faculty of Kerala Agricultural University, KAU Main Campus, Thrissur, Kerala, India

Abstract

This study has been investigated the studies on occupational health and safety in Agriculture Sector. The national and worldwide examinations occupational health and safety in horticulture have been distinguished, the available ones have been researched, condensed and surveyed. The appraisals reasoned that most of the horticulture related word related mishaps are because of tractor mishaps and tractor mishaps for the most part happen due to over-turning of tractors. The vast majority of the tractor mishaps are deadly. Word related mishaps in rural part are expanding with the ascending of horticultural motorization level and this negatively affects the occupational health and safety of the workers. Accordingly, word related occupational health and safety in farming division is a zone that has a ton of opportunity to get better and giving in-administration preparing and proceeding with the endeavors in the region of word related occupational health and safety is profoundly critical for conveying the word related mishaps to a base dimension. Moreover, the coordinated effort between open establishments, NGO’s (Non-Governmental Organizations) and colleges need to proceed concerning occupational health and safety.

Keywords

Agricultural worker, Occupational health and safety, and Labours.

To cite this article

 Yadav, R., & Mohan, A. (2019). An occupational Health and Safety for Agriculture Sector, International Journal of Engineering, IT and Scientific Research (IJEISR). Vol. 3, No. 1, pp.13-18. Doi:10.31219/osf.io/58vzj

Copyright

Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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