Can Technological Development affect positively Employment Policy?

Author/s

Al-Saleh O.H., & Allen, M.B.

Department of Management, College of Business Administration, University of Texas, Arlington,, USA.

 

Abstract

It is known about the role of technological factors in HR. Technology changes the world of business and transforms the labor market. This work focuses in particular on the impact of new technologies to provide employment to workers, as well as self-employment. There are clear possibilities and wider use of digital tools. The government, companies and individuals today can benefit greatly from new “digital jobs” and from the use of digital tools. However, technology also brings risks. Some jobs can be digitized to varying degrees, and some workers or part of their functions are replaced with new technology. The ability to take advantage of these opportunities will vary from individual to individual; workers with higher skill levels are more likely to benefit, while those with lower levels of skills may be less willing to private new technologies, and therefore may be more at risk of poorer quality of work and even loss of work. Moreover, it seems that the larger the technology gap between domestic and foreign establishments.

Keywords

HR; technology; business; ability; technological development.

To cite this article

Al-Saleh O.H., & Allen, M.B. (2019). Can Technological Development affect positively Employment Policy?, International Journal of Engineering, IT and Scientific Research (IJEISR). Vol. 3, No. 2, pp.17-22. Doi:10.31219/osf.io/5gfmu

 

Copyright

Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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