Plagiarism is the copying of ideas, text, data and other creative work (e.g. tables, figures, and graphs) and presenting it as original research without proper citation. Plagiarism is a serious violation. We define plagiarism as a case in which a paper reproduces another work with at least 20% similarity and without citation. All of the following are considered plagiarism:

  • Turning in someone else’s work as your own
  • Copying words or ideas from someone else without giving credit
  • Failing to put a quotation in quotation marks
  • Giving incorrect information about the source of a quotation
  • Changing words but copying the sentence structure of a source without giving credit
  • Copying so many words or ideas from a source that it makes up the majority of your work, whether you give credit or not (see our section on “fair use” rules)

If evidence of plagiarism is found before or after acceptance or after the publication of the paper, the author will be offered a chance to defense his\her paper. If the arguments are not found to be satisfactory, the manuscript will be retracted and Authors found to have been guilty of plagiarism will no longer have papers accepted for publication in Journal.

However, most cases of plagiarism can be avoided, however, by citing sources. Simply acknowledging that certain material has been borrowed and providing your audience with the information necessary to find that source is usually enough to prevent plagiarism. See our section on citation for more information on how to cite sources properly.

For preventing Plagiarism during writing, International Scientific Journals (ISJ) has suggested a checklist that present in the Website of plagiarism.org  (Please click here).